PRIVATE JAMES MORRIS JONES

No. 22135, 17th Battalion, The King's (Liverpool) Regiment (4th Liverpool Pals)

Private James Jones was the eldest of the two sons of the Rev. Owen Baldwyn and Mrs Elizabeth Jones, who, by 1911 had retired to live at Groes Llwyd, nr Guilsfield. The Reverend Jones was a Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Minister, which meant the family moved regularly and James lived in Llanasa, Flintshire, Gwersyllt, Denbighshire and on Merseyside, where there were a number of well-attended Welsh chapels in the early part of the 20th Century. By 1911 he was working as a Grocer’s Assistant in Litherland, which is now part of Merseyside, although at that time it was in Lancashire. The record of when James enlisted exists but is very indistinct, and it is not possible to make out when he enlisted, although he did enlist in Liverpool; but in early May 1918, James was serving in Belgium with the King's (Liverpool Pals) at an area known as Ridge Wood, the name given to the wood standing on high ground between the Kemmel road and Dickebusch Lake 5 kms from the Flemish town of Leper, Belgium. Leper is perhaps better known by its French name, Ypres.

James was severely wounded by a shell on the battlefield at Ypres on the 5th of May 1918, and although transferred to the casualty clearing station at Arneke, he did not recover, and died three days later, on the 8th May 1918, aged 34 years. He is buried at Arneke British Cemetery, grave ref: 11. c. 15.

James is one of the few servicemen for whom comprehensive records exist, some 17 copies of original documents are lodged with one of the popular genealogical sites, including details of his injuries, his effects, notifications to his family etc. The medical record, with its graphic description of his wounds, reveals the reality of the type of injuries sustained by some ordinance or a shell landed very close by, injuring his lower torso and causing internal injuries. The administration associated with the War was immense, and great care was taking to ensure any belongings were, where possible, returned to relatives. The form to the right shows the official notification of James’ effects, sent to his sister, Marian, at the Post Office, some three months after his death. some ordinance or a shell landed very close by, injuring his lower torso and causing internal injuries.

The administration associated with the War was immense, and great care was taking to ensure any belongings were, where possible, returned to relatives. The form below shows the official notification of James’ effects, sent to his sister, Marian, at the Post Office, some three months after his death.